Your Career: What Do You Really Want?

By AJE Recruiting Specialist
America’s Job Exchange

Your Career: What Do You Really Want?Regardless of what career path you choose, fundamentally most of us work because we need to earn a living. At some point in all of our careers, however, the inevitable question is posed "Is this what I want to be doing?" While this can seem like a daunting question, if you approach finding the answer in a methodical manner, you can work towards building a more fulfilling career.

As counter–intuitive as it may sound, in order to find a response to your question, you first have to begin by asking yourself a series of "smaller" questions – the first of which is, are you doing what you love?

Choosing a career that is associated with something you enjoy will better lead to not only a fulfilling job, but success. What is your passion? What do you like spending time on? These are the preliminary questions you should pose. This can be anything from organizing to your love of painting.

Once you hone in on a passion or a skill that brings you joy, you can and should correlate this to a career path. Your ability to organize can mean you would do well in any job that requires this skill set, anything from a project planner to a job as a data scientist. Your love of painting may mean you may want to pursue a career working in a gallery or a museum, where you will be surrounded by that which you enjoy.

The next question to ask yourself is, "Can I find satisfaction in my current career or do I need to change paths altogether?" Perhaps the job you were meant to be doing can be found in your present career – or at your current company. Take a closer look at the industry you are in or the projects you are doing at work. What projects spark the most interest? Pay attention to the activities you do on a daily basis and those that bring you the most joy. There may be opportunities to focus on these areas more once you define what interests you most. By paying close attention to what you do on a daily basis you can begin to map out your dream job.

Changing careers or finding a career you love requires a long–term investment of time and energy. Tackling this by taking small steps can help. Or perhaps you’re not ready to make this type of investment. Sometimes learning to love the job you’re in can be as simple as making some small adjustments, from focusing on the projects you enjoy to asking to branch out into another division of the company you are in.

For more career advice, visit us at www.americasjobexchange.com.